Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4
of tax cuts, which later led to a near government shutdown in 2011 and then the current fiscal cliff battle. so i got to ask this, when you were all kind of sitting around, drinking coffee and coming up with this idea, did you, you know, see all this working out? or did you even think about what the end of 2012 would be looking like? >> well, alison, let's look back a little bit and first remember how we got here. and, you're right, in 2001, we were worried about the president was worried about the storm clouds on the horizon in terms of the economy. and so we were looking for a fiscal stimulus that might be helpful to the broader economy and therefore you got the first round of bush tax cuts which reduced rates on -- marginal rates across the board. but most importantly brought the top marginal rate from 39.6% to roughly 36%. and what that did was allow top rate taxpayers who are often were individual citizens that run small businesses have the ability to have reduced tax rates and then as a consequence have that stimulus and have more capital to hire and to bring other people into
a deal can be cut in time to avert the fiscal cliff. on saturday, the president was at work here in the white house but all eyes were on the senate where negotiators were trading deal points and revenue figures to try to reach an agreement all sides can stomach. the baseline for the president, any bipartisan bill would have to extend unemployment insurance that would affect some 2 million americans and increase taxes for the highest income earners. but negotiators can still work out exactly where that tax increase would hit and whether they would halt an increase in the estate tax. in case those discussions break down, the president asked harry reid to prepare a separate bill to put on the floor of the senate that would raise taxes on households that earn $250,000 or more. now, that's really a democratic proposal and you could expect republicans to block it, so, rather than thinking of that as a stop gap measure, probably think of it as a political measure to shift the responsibility for failure on to republicans just before the nation hits the hour of wreckening. alison? >> than
is on the fiscal cliff. washington has less than 48 hours to make a deal before billions in tax increases and spending cuts take effect. senate negotiators stayed late into the night trying to work out a plan that would pass a vote. both houses of congress would convene later this afternoon in a rare sunday session. in his weekly address, the president took his message directly to the public calling for congress to come together to pass a deal. >> for the past couple months, i have been working with people in both parties with the help of business leaders and ordinary americans to come together around a plan to grow the economy and shrink our deficits. it's a balance plan. one that would protect the middle class, cut spending in a responsible way and ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little more. and i'll keep working with anybody who's serious about getting a comprehensive plan like this done because it's the right thing to do for our economic growth. but we're now at the point where in just a couple of days the law says that every american's tax rates are going up. every american's
tock, the clock is ticking. three days from possibly going over the fiscal cliff. it's our focus this morning. if lawmakers fail to reach a deal, that would mean spending cuts and tax hikes for 88% of all american households come tuesday. look at these numbers from the tax policy center. some of the poorest americans who make up to $20,000 a year, will have to shell out $412 more to the irs and everyone earning more than $40,000 a year will be affected. if you make $40,000 to $64,000, you'll pay almost $2,000 a year, if you make between $64,000 to $108,000, that jumps up to 3,500. and anybody making more than $108,000, yeah, you'll have to give up a little more than $14,000. overall, the average american will pay more than $3,500 a year. will lawmakers be able to pull off a deal before the new year? here's cnn chief correspondent ali velshi. >> alison, i have no idea whether we'll get a fiscal cliff deal done or not. i do have a pretty good idea as to how we got into this gigantic pickle in the first place. >> now we've passed a bold package of tax relief for america's families a
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4